Fox Creek

Empire Metals Corp. is a canadian mining company exploring Fox Creek area for the potential to extract lithium, potassium, boron, bromine, magnesium and other elements of interest from saline formation water (or brine) that is currently being extracted by petro-operators as a waste-product associated with the oil and gas production.

Empire’s Fox Creek Property is located in west-central Alberta and includes 37 largely contiguous Alberta Metallic and Industrial Permits, totalling 278,431.02 ha. The approximate centre of the Property is 35 kilometers (km) south-southeast of the Town of Fox Creek, 60 km west of the Town of Whitecourt, and 210 km northwest of the City of Edmonton. The Property is situated in Universal Transvere Mercator Zone 11 and is bound by eastings 470950 and 563600 m east, and northings 5971120 and 6029460 m north, using North American Datum 1927.

Historic exploration on the Property, and in the Fox Creek area, has been focused on oil and gas exploration and production. The first exploration and sampling programs to test the brine potential of the Beaverhill Lake aquifer were conducted on the property on the Property in 2009 and 2010 by Channel Resources Ltd.

Lithium brine reservoirs are accumulations of saline ground waters enriched in dissolved lithium that occur in a closed basin in arid regions. The brine will typically contain between 200 to 1,400 mg/litre and are either pumped to the surface of from free flowing aquifers then discharged into progressive evaporation ponds that yield a series of ponds with substantially greater concentrations of Lithium. The best known North American deposit for this type of lithium brine concentration is located in Clayton Valley, Nevada.